Ongoing services that help your family in three critical ways:

  1. Clarify and convey the values that define your family.

  2. Measure your family's alignment with your values.

  3. Help your family embrace and express your values.

 

Crafting a strong yet flexible foundation.

 

Proverbs 13:22 says "a good man leaves an inheritance for his children's children."

Money is part of this, but money without character development can be a very dangerous gift. The goal of this phase is to explore non-monetary elements of inheritance, and to get clear enough family values that we can draw the family into a shared perspective of those values. We can communicate the values to your family directly, or in a variety of story or experience-based ways.

Family values need to be timeless, but they also need to allow for flexibility in their expression over time. The clarification phase charts an initial course to which we can return time and again for years. It also divines the difference between personal preferences and the identity-defining hills your family is willing to die upon.

Maybe surprisingly, the first set of values we gather rarely proves to be the set a family builds around once the thinking gets tested and shaped by the entire family.

 

See where you stand, and where you're headed.

 

The big word in this effort is "location." Are we where we want to be? How do we move? How do the felt roles of one generation compare with those of another?

Terah was called to the Promised Land but only went half way. Abraham picked up and finished the journey. Isaac knew God as "the Fear" because he'd experienced the view, bound on an altar, as his father raised a knife to sacrifice the boy. Jacob was a sneak who robbed his brother's birthright. Jacob's sons sold their brother into slavery. Joseph suffered and saved his family. One family story – very different generational roles.

We'll consider the "location" in time among generations of your family. We'll plot different family members' perspectives on topics like obligation vs prerogative, or tradition vs vision. Same with issues of faith, institutional engagement, philanthropy, risk tolerance, and home life priorities. 

We'll also consider together which "flames" from one generation the next wants to proudly pass along, and which they feel called to firewall against ... which is another way of looking at "locations" within relationships. When we know where we are, we can decide where we want to go.

 

A thoughtful, curated family conversation.

 

Sharing common ground is all about offering stories and exchanging life experiences.

We create memoirs, wisdom collections, children's books, life threshold experiences, videos, art, music, events, and personal vision plans – each with the dual goal of helping family members know where they stand, and sharing their perspectives with the people they love. 

We follow a "call and response" model, like you may notice in jazz. Different voices, each following different grooves, all revolving around a single theme. 

In most families, the first "speaker" is a patriarch or matriarch, but it's not at all uncommon for the second or third generation to offer the first "call" to invite a response of love from the family.